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Video Shows (or Channels) Are Attracting Real Money


Beet.TV is calling this a “boom time for niche media” as in Believe It: Boom Time in Niche Media is Now: Mediapost Sells for $23 Million….WallStrip Producer Explains the $5 Million Value Proposition for CBS..and More! Impressive sales for producers who started their own thing, only on the web. Real sales for real substantial dollars. Nothing pie in the sky. Unquestionably, internet video programming has become a REAL market.

NYTimes covered the MediaBistro sale

A New Way to Distribute Your Videos on the Web

What’s a video producer to do? We all want to have as many people as possible see whatever we produce… So should we upload our clips to MySpace, to YouTube, to Google Video, etc. etc. Or, wouldn’t it be nice to have a simple web-based service that does this kind of distribution for us?

Well, now there is. It’s called Hey!Spread. Get it? They help you spread your video around the web.

It’s a basic, practical, straight-forward service (but you do need to set up accounts at the services you want them to populate with your clips) and most importantly, it’s immediately useful. I like that. 😉

Thanks to TechCruch for their mini-review of this service.

Online Video Monetization Blooming

If you still don’t believe that there’s money to be made, not to mention good marketing buzz to be generated, with online video clips, then you better check out The New York Times coverage of the competition between video sites to make revenue sharing deals with producers and talent who can develop a following using online video. They call it, New Hot Properties: YouTube Celebrities.

Online Video Explosion Signposts

One nice thing about the online video explosion, revolution, or whatever you want to call it, is that it does have signposts. (FYI, I’m still waiting for some professional publisher to ask me to write more about all this… hello?!).

But meanwhile here are a couple of recent articles and/or posts that I found to be of interest and encouraging re: the re-emergence of my own “video-video” enterprises (videos about video and online communications) which are percolating in the background:

> VideoEgg Hits 3 Million Uploads — TechCrunch insights on the growth of this online video leader vis a vis GooTube (Google-YouTube) who may have the best ad platform of the moment. I said “may.”

> All The World’s a Stage (That Includes the Internet) — NYTimes writer Scott Kirsner offers a nice overview with examples of how user-generated content can and is making money, at least for a few leading edge folks.

Online TV & Video: “social revolution” No Longer an Exaggeration

Sighting a pressing TV industry need to monetize the “massive interest in online (video) content,” eMarketer.com summarized an Informa Telecoms & Media research report (which I could not find on their site) including numbers that would make almost any venture investor salivate. For example, “In the US alone, revenues are forecast to rise from $538 million in 2006 to nearly $4 billion in 2012.”

“These trends are now so pronounced, that the term ‘social revolution’ no longer seems too much of an exaggeration,” said Adam Thomas of Informa.

Personally, today, I was checking out VideoEgg.com which boasts an easy to use video upload, Flash compress, and, yes, video editing platform as well as a pretty impressive online video ad network that’s focused on social networking sites.

Does anyone have a good comparison of all these new Web 2.0 video platforms?

TechCruch seems to think that SplashCast may have the ultimate player platform.

I wish it was like the Videography days when I could get paid to research and write about this stuff. Who knows, if I can find a way to monetize it, maybe I’ll be doing some video clips soon. Potential channels would include internet marketing, online video, and the joy of golf. But should I do SplashCast channels, distribute via the VideoEggNetwork, BrightCove, all of the above, or what?!?

Whoa! Netflix to Offer Free TV Shows to Members

The battle for the distribution of broadcast programming via the Web is heating up. Apple’s iTunes Store has made big waves by selling TV shows at $1.99 each. Now NetFlix is rolling out what is essentially a perk for membership. Free downloadable TV shows.

Here’s the TechCrunch overview of this announcement and the official NetFlix press release and the NYTimes perspective.

New Easy Way to Monetize Your Internet Video Clips

(Sometimes I still feel like I’m covering the “Video Web” the way I did in my “old days” at Videography, yet I know not how many of you readers even know or care.)

I not only think that AdBrite’s new InVideo service is useful and practical, but I really like the fact that they’re walking their talk with a quick, clean and illustrative video that does a good job (see below) of explaining the advantages of and how this new way to place ads in your internet video clips works (still in invitation-only beta).

Maybe some day I’ll get around to producing some online video content? Especially now that I know that I can produce video clips with easily self-embedded video ads that are not offensive and which will travel with an embedded video player to anyone else’s website. Nice!

Video & You: Bigger Than Ever

I’ve been talking about how hot the online video business and content is getting for months, but it’s now beyond my comprehension. Not only are the Skype founders testing a new broadband video service and the NY Times is reporting a new online video service being put together by “a handful of giant media companies, like NBC Universal, the News Corporation, Viacom and possibly CBS,” but user-generated content a.k.a. “you” is the person on the year and the cover of Time magazine’s year end issue. The real story behind this is Web 2.0 and, of course, YouTube. For example, the article explains that last year users were downloading 10 million clips a DAY from YouTube. This year: 100 million video clips a day… read more of Time’s perspective… (including the list of related articles.)

Making Money on the Video Web

Any of you blog readers remember my Videography columns? Just curious. In any case, FYI for the rest of you, I’ve been writing about video on the web since the first streaming video vendors (in fact I consulted by VDONet which preceeded Real in terms of online video). Not that that’s important, but it’s nice to see the financial eco-system aka the online video marketplace coming of age to a point where people think there’s a business there. Of course, the biggest piece is the sale of movies, TV shows and other commercial forms of entertainment. But, as I’m found of saying, “stay tuned”… there’s more.

If you’re involved in the online video marketplace and its business potential, you’ll find this eMarketer.com report about other research reports regarding the “MoneyTube,” Online Video Becomes a Real Business, to be of interest.

The Birth of the “Social Video Network” (video blogging & social networking remixed)

You take a little MySpace, you add some YouTube, and mash ’em up. That’s the latest in easy to use video blogging… er well, I mean video sharing/syndication… well, actually, I mean video “channels” based on MySpace social networking and YouTube video sharing type o’ technologies.

The business model et al was written up on AlwaysOn or go straight to Dave.tv (the “social broadcast network”) or vsocial.